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  1. #1
    ilyaz started this thread.
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    Any way to estimate more than scrap value of a Jeep from one photo

    We have this Jeep Cherokee that has been sitting in our neighbor's carport for years. The car is more than 30 years old, since the registration sticker has 86 on it! I know that this is just one photo, but is there any way to tell from it if the car might be worth more than scrap?

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  2. #2
    mikeinreco's Avatar
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    From that one picture the body looks good and if it has been under carport should be salvageable...that was a popular model so sure someone could use it for parts

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  4. #3
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    i would suggest u take more clear pics of engine, body and interior and list it on Craigslist etc ...but make sure u have permission to sell it and that the papers for it are available.

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    Something like that might go for 500.00 - 800.00 $ in this area if it was in running condition. It would be something that somebody could use as their daily driver in the winter to get back and forth to work.

    JMHO ... a lot of it would hinge on why it was parked in the first place. The V6 2.8 liter wasn't one of the best motors that they ever made. You never can tell though ... it could be a diamond in the rough. It could be low miles ( under 80k.) with no real problems. A couple of days work and two - three hundred in parts could make it roadable again.

    My wife's niece picked up an 85 Dodge Daytona late last fall from the widow of a mechanic for 800.00$. There were a few mechanical problems to sort through because it had been sitting for so long ... but it's turned out to be a reliable car for her.

    Perhaps check the title laws in your state ? You only need a bill of sale , and not a title, on pre. 1995 vehicles here in Maine.

    One thing i would definitely recommend. Drop the fuel tank and flush out the fuel lines before you try to start it. Also, pull the plugs and put a teaspoon of oil into each of the cylinders. Bad gas or stuck piston rings could instantly trash an otherwise good motor on startup after sitting so long.

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  8. #5
    ilyaz started this thread.
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    The house belongs to an elderly lady whose husband died 10+ years ago - I suspect the Jeep was his. I don't really know her that well, so before approaching her about title, taking detailed photos and so on, I want to get a sense if it would even be worth it.

    I am in suburban MD, so the weather here is humid pretty much year round -- I am wondering if this means the guts all rotted out even though the has been was in the carport all these years...

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    hills's Avatar
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    The big thing is the underneath. A car or truck can look perfectly good when you're standing there looking at it and be a complete horror show of rust underneath. A lot of it depends on if there's salt in the environment. Maybe salt air from the ocean ... maybe they use ice melting chemicals on the roads in the winter ?

    Is it worth the effort ? Only you can be the judge.

    If mechanical stuff is what you do on a regular basis ... you have the tools and knowledge to flip it for a profit with a minimum of problems. That kind of thing is right up your alley.

    If you have to ask ... then maybe not so much ?

    You might be able to sell it as /where is without ever having to touch it. On the other hand ... you might get saddled with a big lawn ornament.

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  11. #7
    APA's Avatar
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    If the car has low miles, the interest is going to be a lot higher.

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  13. #8
    ilyaz started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hills View Post
    The big thing is the underneath. A car or truck can look perfectly good when you're standing there looking at it and be a complete horror show of rust underneath. A lot of it depends on if there's salt in the environment. Maybe salt air from the ocean ... maybe they use ice melting chemicals on the roads in the winter ?

    Is it worth the effort ? Only you can be the judge.

    If mechanical stuff is what you do on a regular basis ... you have the tools and knowledge to flip it for a profit with a minimum of problems. That kind of thing is right up your alley.

    If you have to ask ... then maybe not so much ?

    You might be able to sell it as /where is without ever having to touch it. On the other hand ... you might get saddled with a big lawn ornament.
    Too far from the ocean but we definitely have salt on roads in winter although probably not nearly as much as you do in Maine.

    I definitely wouldn't be working on the car myself, I'd be just a middle-man between her and a salvage yard or a mechanic.

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  15. #9
    ilyaz started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by APA View Post
    If the car has low miles, the interest is going to be a lot higher.
    That's a great point thanks

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  17. #10
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    When you decide to approach the lady and look at the vehicle the first thing I would do is check the fan belts and windshield whippers. This provides an idea of the damage moisture has done to the seals throughout the vehicle. Next try turning the fan blade and see if the engine is seized. If the engine is seized, it would be scrap in my opinion although you might still be able to part it out. If the fan belts are destroyed, try using a ratchet strap or I have used a pair of ladies nylons to check the pullies on the alternator, air conditioner, etc. another indicator of the moisture damage throughout the vehicle. These steps and a visual inspection determine my interest in any piece of machinery very quickly.
    Give back more to this world than we take.

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  19. #11
    ilyaz started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patriot76 View Post
    When you decide to approach the lady and look at the vehicle the first thing I would do is check the fan belts and windshield whippers. This provides an idea of the damage moisture has done to the seals throughout the vehicle. Next try turning the fan blade and see if the engine is seized. If the engine is seized, it would be scrap in my opinion although you might still be able to part it out. If the fan belts are destroyed, try using a ratchet strap or I have used a pair of ladies nylons to check the pullies on the alternator, air conditioner, etc. another indicator of the moisture damage throughout the vehicle. These steps and a visual inspection determine my interest in any piece of machinery very quickly.
    Noted, thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ilyaz View Post
    Too far from the ocean but we definitely have salt on roads in winter although probably not nearly as much as you do in Maine.

    I definitely wouldn't be working on the car myself, I'd be just a middle-man between her and a salvage yard or a mechanic.
    Smart man ! There's a lot less time and effort if you can act as a go-between.

    One little quickie in regard to rust.The vehicles here generally rust out from back to front. Just slide in under the back and check out the back six inches of frame and cross members with a flashlight. If they're clean ... there's a reasonably good chance that everything forward is in fairly good shape in regard to rust.

    The back bumper looks okay and i'm not seeing rust staining or paint blistering on any of the body panels in the picture.

    That's a good sign.

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  22. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patriot76 View Post
    If the fan belts are destroyed, try using a ratchet strap or I have used a pair of ladies nylons to check the pullies on the alternator, air conditioner, etc.
    Showing your age

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  24. #14
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    There is a Jeep Forum which is great for all Jeep enthusiasts. Lots of folks rebuild those Cherokees. It most certainly has more value than todays measly scrap prices

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