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  1. #61

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    When you don't have a crane truck handy, I've pulled and installed a few engines using three tree poles to make a tripod, then with my first winch truck installed gin poles for those heavy lifts.

    One way or the other we'll get than cut up military that we cut up for scrap loaded.





    Last edited by Proton; 08-14-2018 at 12:37 PM.


  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proton View Post
    What is your local yard paying per ton for scrap cars and trucks, versus prepared short as you call it.

    Once you chop up your Military truck your going to find out that the cab, fenders and the hood are not considered heavy melt. Tires and glass will not be allowed in your heavy melt load, plus your going to loose a few hundred pounds of caked on grease, dirt and mud hidden in body pockets by cutting the truck up.



    The last large bottle of oxygen I bought a few years ago was just under $100.00 a 20 pound bottle of propane around $25.00. The propane bottle will last for about five large oxygen.

    I figure even for a noob one large bottle of oxygen would be enough to cut that MILITARY truck up into small bits.

    We've spent plenty of time discussing how to cut this truck up and now your new found confidence feel that you can burn one to the ground, I don't doubt for a minute that you could. Now that it's on the ground how are you going to load it.

    Shall we take it to the next stage - loading.

    Living on the west coast, Budget kept a crane truck rental for the commercial fisherman and others like myself. I myself on several occasions had rented that truck, in fact this truck was the first time I had even used a truck mounted knuckle crane.

    The rental truck was fortunately on the same end of a 60 mile journey as the scrap yard, I would pick the truck up late in the day then drive that 60 miles home and be up at 5:00 am to have it loaded and back its home late in the afternoon.

    One of the loads I had was an old D8 Cat with half the engine missing and no blade, the crane would not lift the whole cat but I found that it would lift one end at a time. Once an end was lifted would stack railway ties under then lift the other end and stack more ties under.

    I did this until each end of the cat was level with the truck deck, then gradually worked each end of the cat over onto the deck of the truck.

    At this time of my life was in my early 20's, now at this late time of my life I would like to hear how your going to load and haul the scrap from this military truck your planning to butcher.
    The way you describe the story of this CAT, did you load it and haul to the scrap yard in one piece? Of course, that's the most hassle-free way, right? Granted I may get less for it for obvious reasons...

    I figured small chunks and a flatbed. Lifting, well small crane or a small backhoe. But always open to other ideas! Young and inexperienced here (20 myself).

    With all your guys' crazy encouragement I almost might have to butcher one just so I can actually report back on the results, even if my other reasons for such never come to be. Either that or haul one in whole just to report back, here again. I never thought my topic would be so "intriguing" but apparently it is!

    And dirt and grease...you described a 5 ton perfectly. As much as I also enjoy them in their stock form your description is accurate. I've spent a few hours under them with a grease gun and a wire brush and a propane torch....

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  4. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by M923 View Post
    The way you describe the story of this CAT, did you load it and haul to the scrap yard in one piece? Of course, that's the most hassle-free way, right? Granted I may get less for it for obvious reasons...

    I figured small chunks and a flatbed. Lifting, well small crane or a small backhoe. But always open to other ideas! Young and inexperienced here (20 myself).

    With all your guys' crazy encouragement I almost might have to butcher one just so I can actually report back on the results, even if my other reasons for such never come to be. Either that or haul one in whole just to report back, here again. I never thought my topic would be so "intriguing" but apparently it is!

    And dirt and grease...you described a 5 ton perfectly. As much as I also enjoy them in their stock form your description is accurate. I've spent a few hours under them with a grease gun and a wire brush and a propane torch....
    What was left of the D8 went as one piece, wanted that rental truck back by the end of the day.

    You'll soon learn that cutting up heavy iron takes time and money for consumables, far more advantages to haul it in as large chunks.

    Some tracked machines have pads and chains that are made from manganese again in my 20's I had cut up a large ball mill used to grind limestone into powder. The mill was half full of balls, I hand bombed two and a half tons onto my truck then when I got to the yard the magnet would not pick them up.

    The yard told me what they were made from and did not want them, they were hand bombed off of the truck and to this day are probably buried in the mud at the yard. My contribution for free landfill.

    Fortunately the liners inside the mill were magnetic, from that day forward I learned the value of having a small pocket magnet and its use.

    Let the yard break up and separate the large scrap, iron, cast steel and cast iron all have different uses and vales. If I were in either the Yukon or Alaska I would specialise in the metals that resist abrasion.

    Crawler chains and pads bucket teeth, slurry pumps, liners from ball mills or cone crushers, last I heard these metals were bringing in $1,200.00 ton at the foundry. That information is in an older post that I made not sure under which user name.

    I named the foundry that purchases this type of scrap including the location, to be a player your'll need a hand held XRF to assure quality or learn how to acid test your metals.

    One bad load to this foundry and you've lost your buyer.

  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proton View Post
    What was left of the D8 went as one piece, wanted that rental truck back by the end of the day.

    You'll soon learn that cutting up heavy iron takes time and money for consumables, far more advantages to haul it in as large chunks.

    Some tracked machines have pads and chains that are made from manganese again in my 20's I had cut up a large ball mill used to grind limestone into powder. The mill was half full of balls, I hand bombed two and a half tons onto my truck then when I got to the yard the magnet would not pick them up.

    The yard told me what they were made from and did not want them, they were hand bombed off of the truck and to this day are probably buried in the mud at the yard. My contribution for free landfill.

    Fortunately the liners inside the mill were magnetic, from that day forward I learned the value of having a small pocket magnet and its use.

    Let the yard break up and separate the large scrap, iron, cast steel and cast iron all have different uses and vales. If I were in either the Yukon or Alaska I would specialise in the metals that resist abrasion.

    Crawler chains and pads bucket teeth, slurry pumps, liners from ball mills or cone crushers, last I heard these metals were bringing in $1,200.00 ton at the foundry. That information is in an older post that I made not sure under which user name.

    I named the foundry that purchases this type of scrap including the location, to be a player your'll need a hand held XRF to assure quality or learn how to acid test your metals.

    One bad load to this foundry and you've lost your buyer.
    So in other words, should I have this thing taken in as whole as possible? Eliminates the torching and lifting, no?

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  7. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proton View Post
    When you don't have a crane truck handy, I've pulled and installed a few engines using three tree poles to make a tripod, then with my first winch truck installed gin poles for those heavy lifts.

    One way or the other we'll get than cut up military that we cut up for scrap loaded.



    Interesting and duly noted! With your advice I almost have to do this now, no? Just to report back...

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  9. #66

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    One of my trucks was a tractor with a trailer, my buddy had a 3 ton with gin poles we used his truck to load the trailer and were were able to double deck the cars.

    This is how we would load before we could afford crane trucks and a loader, my one and only loader an old Michigan with a four cylinder Detroit diesel that I picked up for $500.00. This came with a bucket, I paid $1000.00 for another parts machine that had forks and tires.

    I used that 500 dollar Michigan for four years then sold it when we sold the yard.

    I had a GSW excavator that was on loan from the a friend that owns a ready mix plant, we had that machine for three years and used it for loading the trailers.

    After we cleaned up a bunch of old logging equipment on my partners property after her husband passed we mostly did scrap cars any iron we have we stuffed into the cars for extra weight.

    It got so bad with the D.O.T. ( Department of Transport ) I could no longer make loads to Vancouver with out being stopped in each of the three municipality's I had the pass through. Marshalling scrap at the yard was the best t and smartest move I ever did., let the scrap yard come to me.

    The D.O.T. loves a working man especially one that looks like he is able to pay tickets. There were times that I would go late at night then once I got to the yard would sleep in the truck until the yard opened on the morning. Quite often I would be joined by others during the evening also trying to avoid the D.O.T..

    I did learn though, if you do get ticked plead not guilty, chances are the DOT cop is a no show and the judge will toss the case. The DOT keeps it's enforcers on the highway were they rake in the money. No money to be made with their enforcer sitting in court ,most of the day.

    Either haul it in whole and if you do cut it up, have it all prepared that have the yard drop a trailer or a roll off and be ready to load and be quick about it. Trying up bins and trailers is costing the yard money they like to keep them moving from job to job site.

    Before I forget on the Michigan loader I had a spare hydraulic spool which was probably intended ti use on a four in one bucket or a clam, I installed a hydraulic winch and this was used to lower heavy pieces into the trailer so as not to damage the bottom of the trailer. Once I had the bottom of the trailer covered then I could drop stuff onto it with out damaging the trailer.

    You screw up the scrap yard bin or trailer they'll soon refuse to send out another.

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  11. #67
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    I believe it on the hassle on the yard’s end. I may take it in whole or nearly whole.

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  13. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by M923 View Post
    I believe it on the hassle on the yard’s end. I may take it in whole or nearly whole.
    When you yard owner recognises that you have initiative and the means to get her done, remember that your not paying s crew by the hour for travel and torch and loading.

    I've been the beneficiary of scrap that was either to little in volume and to far for the yard to go after, on one occasion about 20 tons of rail the crew had over looked. The yard owner gave me a letter of authorisation to remove the rail even though the cut up rail was going to a yard geographically closer and more convenient for me.

    Once I had the rail cut up the yard in Pentiction B.C. at my request sent out a self loader to pick up the scrap rail. If I remember correctly I may have worked in a deal where the yard supplied the oxygen.

    On anther deal same yard that forgot the rail had left behind more scrap up the Harrison Lake, they cleaned up the main site but did not bother heading further up the lake for bits of machinery that was scattered. Some older cats, triple drum winches and an old Adam grader.

    Originally when the yard had acquired this huge lot of scrap it was their intention to barge the scrap out, someone had neglected to find out the width of a railway bridge going over the Harrison River. The barge would not fit through and this changed from a water operation to a trucking operation which is more expensive.

    Had they been able to use the barge then going after the other pieces of machinery further up the lake would have been viable, the road leading further up the lake has some very steep hills with one having a thick layer of loose sand which makes it almost impossible for large trucks to make the grade.

    Most heavy traffic is brought up after freeze up or is towed up the hill with a cat, access by water would have circumnavigated the hill. Trucks with four wheel drive could easily make the grade.

    Years ago was given a steam shovel, the boiler was full of holes so they used a large diesel operated air compressor to operate the shovel, they used it for prospecting. They had used the shovel to make a road down to where she sits to this day.

    When they shut down for the winter had brought the air compressor up the rough road they had cut in for maintenance then during the spring runoff the road had washed out and they had no way of getting the air compressor back down to the shovel.

    The placer claim and the shovel were both abandoned at this time and that steam shovel has sat unmolested for these past 40 years. There ya go my claim to fame I own an old Bucyrus steam shovel which sits on the banks of the Fraser River a bit east of North Bend.

    Before the bridge was built between Boston Bar and North Bend you had to cross the river with the aerial ferry, any scrap leaving the North Bend side of the river either left by rail or via logging roads to Lillooette.

    This is the terrain worked in and know every back road there is on BC. I've cut and hauled scrap from most and explored others with either some old beater of a 4x4 or by dirt bike and I prefer the latter for getting over and around wash outs.

    My shovel is on the north side of the Fraser River and you can see from the first image the banks are very steep.





  14. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proton View Post
    When you yard owner recognises that you have initiative and the means to get her done, remember that your not paying s crew by the hour for travel and torch and loading.

    I've been the beneficiary of scrap that was either to little in volume and to far for the yard to go after, on one occasion about 20 tons of rail the crew had over looked. The yard owner gave me a letter of authorisation to remove the rail even though the cut up rail was going to a yard geographically closer and more convenient for me.

    Once I had the rail cut up the yard in Pentiction B.C. at my request sent out a self loader to pick up the scrap rail. If I remember correctly I may have worked in a deal where the yard supplied the oxygen.

    On anther deal same yard that forgot the rail had left behind more scrap up the Harrison Lake, they cleaned up the main site but did not bother heading further up the lake for bits of machinery that was scattered. Some older cats, triple drum winches and an old Adam grader.

    Originally when the yard had acquired this huge lot of scrap it was their intention to barge the scrap out, someone had neglected to find out the width of a railway bridge going over the Harrison River. The barge would not fit through and this changed from a water operation to a trucking operation which is more expensive.

    Had they been able to use the barge then going after the other pieces of machinery further up the lake would have been viable, the road leading further up the lake has some very steep hills with one having a thick layer of loose sand which makes it almost impossible for large trucks to make the grade.

    Most heavy traffic is brought up after freeze up or is towed up the hill with a cat, access by water would have circumnavigated the hill. Trucks with four wheel drive could easily make the grade.

    Years ago was given a steam shovel, the boiler was full of holes so they used a large diesel operated air compressor to operate the shovel, they used it for prospecting. They had used the shovel to make a road down to where she sits to this day.

    When they shut down for the winter had brought the air compressor up the rough road they had cut in for maintenance then during the spring runoff the road had washed out and they had no way of getting the air compressor back down to the shovel.

    The placer claim and the shovel were both abandoned at this time and that steam shovel has sat unmolested for these past 40 years. There ya go my claim to fame I own an old Bucyrus steam shovel which sits on the banks of the Fraser River a bit east of North Bend.

    Before the bridge was built between Boston Bar and North Bend you had to cross the river with the aerial ferry, any scrap leaving the North Bend side of the river either left by rail or via logging roads to Lillooette.

    This is the terrain worked in and know every back road there is on BC. I've cut and hauled scrap from most and explored others with either some old beater of a 4x4 or by dirt bike and I prefer the latter for getting over and around wash outs.

    My shovel is on the north side of the Fraser River and you can see from the first image the banks are very steep.




    Dude, you have some amazing stories. Just reading these kind of endeavors reminds me of the crazy experiences I've had.

    I actually had much of my drivers ed and first mechanical lessons in/on these Army trucks. I am not joking. I could tell you all kinds of stories.

    I love how this thread is going. Don't be afraid to PM me guys if you feel it's wandering too far. Always curious to hear stories and advice and I'm always up for sharing my bizarre ideas. I'm having other scrapping-related ideas as well.

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  16. #70

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    Not to worry I even hi-jack my own threads often changing the subject matter from the original topic.

  17. #71

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    PERHAPS THIS FITS INTO YOUR SCHEME https://www.canadiancores.com/cores/

    WE BUY AND SELL USED CORES FOR THE FOLLOWING PRODUCT LINES:


    BRAKE SYSTEMS,
    • Brake Calipers
    • Hydro Boosters
    • Master Cylinders


    ELECTRICAL UNITS
    • Alternators
    • Starters
    • AC Compressors


    STEERING COMPONENTS
    • Power Steering Pumps
    • Steering Rack & Pinions
    • Steering Gearboxes


    SMALL ELECTRONICS
    • Computer Cores (ECM, PCM, FICM)
    • Air Flow Sensors
    • Window Lift Motors
    • Window Wiper Motors
    • Electronic Throttle Bodies
    • Transfer Case Motors


    HYBRID VEHICLE PARTS
    • Hybrid Batteries
    • Hybrid Battery Inverters
    • Electric Steering Columns


    DIESEL TRUCK PARTS
    • Diesel Injection Pumps
    • Diesel Injectors
    • High Pressure Oil Pumps
    • Diesel Truck Turbochargers
    Last edited by Proton; 08-15-2018 at 12:11 AM.

  18. #72
    M923 started this thread.
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    Thanks for the info!

    OK, so now, I can already see the suggestions coming for parting one out one flat-rate box at a time?

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  20. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by M923 View Post
    Thanks for the info!

    OK, so now, I can already see the suggestions coming for parting one out one flat-rate box at a time?
    You'll have to think much bigger thoughts than a flat rate box.

    If you haven't heard the US Postal system is haemorrhaging money to the likes of Amazon, changes are in the wind for the USPS.


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