Results 1 to 17 of 17

Full truckload shipping

| Scrap Shipping and Logistics
  1. #1
    JJinLV started this thread.
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    904
    Thanks
    2,528
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 564 Posts

    Full truckload shipping

    Hi all!

    For folks doing scrap as more than a hobby and hoping to scale up their business thought I'd post some basics on full truckload and container freight shipping. For organizing freight shipping I'mmmmmm not your guy lol. Luckily there is a forum member who is! Check the buyer/seller section for a very well reviewed provider of freight services. But I do ship and receive multiple full truckloads of scrap every week as well as a few containers monthly. So here's the basics.

    For highway freight your standard trailer is between 48-53' long. Some carriers also offer 28' trailers. Depending on the weight of the cab your maximum allowable freight load will almost never exceed 45,000lbs in order to stay under the 80,000lb interstate limit. On average, a full truckload by weight is gonna be 43,000-44,000lbs. Some states have higher allowable intrastate limits but if the vehicle is traveling over an interstate highway its maximum weight will be 80,000lbs. In theory if the trucks' empty weight is 32,000lbs then your load could be 48,000lbs but it becomes very difficult to properly axle the truck (you can only have so much weight per axle) at that weight.

    By space instead of weight, the maximum amount of standard gaylords (48x40x36") on pallets is 44 for a 48' trailer and 48 on a 53'. In theory you can have a couple more but that is only if each is stackable and fits without overhang on a standard 48x40" pallet. In practice that is pretty much never the case. Gaylords can be too weak to stack or bulging over the pallet or not centered on the pallet and so on.

    A full truckload by space dimensions doesn't mean it will be full by weight. A standard gaylord of Al/Cu radiator ends won't be much more than 600lbs, and office phones closer to 450lbs. A full truckload of nothing but 450lb gaylords isn't even gonna be 20,000lbs total. This means your price per pound for full truckload freight is gonna be higher than if you shipped 40,000+ lbs. For example if you're shipping a 43,000lbs of something a few hundred miles for $850 you're spending about .019/lb on shipping. But a full truckload at that same price that weighs 19,800lbs would be a little under .043/lb. So if you bought something at .05/lb and sell it al .10/lb, you could absorb that .019/lb shipping and still make about $1300. (43000 x .05= $2150, 43000 x .10= $4300. 4300-2150=$2150. $2150-850= $1300). But at 19,800lbs this total profit drops down to $140. $1300 can justify quite a bit of time to collect and organize and load the material. $140 much less so. So if you're shipping a full truckload of something relatively light, you need a big enough margin to absorb the higher per pound freight rate while a full truckload of something heavier can even be done for things with lower margins.

    To maximize load weight and reduce your per pound freight rate for a 53' trailer that is actually filled around 48' you'll want to average about 900lbs per foot or 3600lbs per four feet. So if you have two standard pallets side by side they'll need to average 1800lbs. That average will get you 43,500lbs. If filling a 40' shipping container to the same weight, you'll want around 1080lbs per foot or closer to 2160lbs per standard pallet space.

    Point of all of this being that surprisingly inexpensive items like ac adapters, low grade aluminum breakage, cast iron and more can be shipped freight with a fine margin and relatively small investment provided you have the time and space to accumulate. And for heavier inexpensive items like sealed units, copper transformers and heavy aluminum breakage like transmissions and engine blocks, it takes surprisingly little space to arrive at a full truckload weight. 11-14 full gaylords of sealed units is enough for a full truckload, a couple more for electric motors. Or in the case of mixed loads, 4 or 5 4000lb pallets compensates for quite a few 300-600lb pallets to get the average weights you need.



    Anyway those are some of the basics for full truckload freight shipping. Hopefully this can help you figure out whether saving up full truckloads of scrap is something you wanna pursue.

  2. The Following 12 Users say Thank You for This Post by JJinLV:



  3. #2
    matador's Avatar
    SMF Badges of Honor

    We purchase laptop computers and many components for greater than scrap value. We offer a shipping reimbursement program.replies

    Member since
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Big Wonderful Wyoming
    Posts
    2,270
    Thanks
    1,790
    Thanked 3,146 Times in 1,426 Posts
    You'll also need a dock to load the truck. That's the real problem for those of us out here in the middle of nowhere- it just eats into your profits so much to have a truck come to you. That, and I can't imagine having enough stuff to fill an entire truck anyways
    More than Scrap Value Shipment Tips: http://www.scrapmetalforum.com/scrap...tml#post242349

  4. #3
    mthomasdev's Avatar
    SMF Badges of Honor


    Member since
    Apr 2012
    Location
    pittsfield, ma
    Posts
    1,218
    Thanks
    329
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 650 Posts
    JJ,

    Great information!

    A few things to add. Chances are you won't get a truck with a lift gate, so you need either a forklift or a loading dock. If you don't have a loading dock, you will also need a pallet jack. When I have shipped FTL, the driver's don't want to touch the load, so you really need someone in the trailer, moving the pallets. That does seem kind of odd. You would think they would want to place the load where they want it.

  5. The Following 3 Users say Thank You for This Post by mthomasdev:


  6. #4
    JJinLV started this thread.
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    904
    Thanks
    2,528
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 564 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by matador View Post
    You'll also need a dock to load the truck. That's the real problem for those of us out here in the middle of nowhere- it just eats into your profits so much to have a truck come to you. That, and I can't imagine having enough stuff to fill an entire truck anyways
    You can get a dependable walkie stacker for as little as $600. That and a pallet jack gets your truck loaded albeit slower than with forklift with a dock or ramp. If you part-time it's hard to imagine how you could get a full truck without some really substantial storage space. Scrapping full time it's hard to say. You have to save up quantity while selling enough to support yourself as you tie up funds buying enough to ship. If you've got a good group of suppliers it's for sure possible though or if you do enough great-than-scrap value to grow your buy-sell margin enough that you don't have as much pressure to sell right away it's possible that way too. All that if it's even desirable for you though! People meeting their goals already certainly don't need to add more work just for the sake of more work and a few more pennies.

  7. #5
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    949
    Thanks
    593
    Thanked 1,370 Times in 422 Posts
    Great thread! Please consider the significant safety challenges involved! Even with a forklift and dock things can get dicey. Now incorporate a $600 walkie and pallet jack the risk is exponentially greater for injury.

    Years ago I remember walking onto a trailer as one of my guys were loading it and I bent over to pick something off of the ground... well when I bent over in a reasonably dark trailer I hit my head on the top pallet of a double stack.... I actually didn't hit the pallet I put a nail into my head... fortunately I had my tetanus shot!

    Also be aware there is a correct way to use a pallet jack. The pallet jack is a tool that incurs one of the most frequent warehouse injuries that can range from minimal to severe/life altering.

    Perhaps I can include a few threads on generally safety for loading/unloading LTL (pallet shipments) and FTL (truckloads) if there is enough interest.
    Additionally, we have an inhouse dedicated logistics so let us know how we can help.
    Specializing in Maximum value for mixed precious metal printed circuit boards and electronics

    Check out our pricing and read some of our RAVING reviews: http://www.scrapmetalforum.com/scrap...tal-scrap.html
    QUESTIONS? Email us: info@CashForComputerScrap.com
    or Chat with us: www.CashForComputerScrap.com

  8. The Following 6 Users say Thank You for This Post by Ewasted:


  9. #6
    gorven's Avatar
    SMF Badges of Honor


    Member since
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    367
    Thanks
    822
    Thanked 445 Times in 180 Posts
    To load a full truck a dock isnt needed as mentioned earlier. As far as getting a liftgate truck for a full truck is nearly impossible as their are very few out there. If you want to pay a extra few hundred dollars you can get drivers to load the truck. If you have say 12 or so gaylords of material a partial load maybe a option.

    Thanks JJ for your post

  10. The Following 3 Users say Thank You for This Post by gorven:


  11. #7
    JJinLV started this thread.
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    904
    Thanks
    2,528
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 564 Posts
    My first job driving a lift was at a supermarket almost twenty years ago and there we unloaded the trucks with a walker and a pallet jack. Lugging those full pallets of milk with a pallet jack was...unenviable lol. Worst injury ever seen anyone incur with a pallet jack, thankfully, is running over their toes while going backwards and not paying attention or banging their shins. But absolutely anytime you put a couple thousand pounds on wheels danger is just incredibly possible. There are also smaller electric jacks that are sized properly for use inside a trailer that are safer in most aspects but potentially more dangerous too. With care, practice and good habits loading a truck safely even with a pallet jack can be one of the less risky parts of scrap. Then again in an industry that includes a lot of sharp things, heavy things, toxic things and power tools perhaps that isn't saying much lol

  12. The Following 4 Users say Thank You for This Post by JJinLV:


  13. #8
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    949
    Thanks
    593
    Thanked 1,370 Times in 422 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by gorven View Post
    To load a full truck a dock isnt needed as mentioned earlier. As far as getting a liftgate truck for a full truck is nearly impossible as their are very few out there. If you want to pay a extra few hundred dollars you can get drivers to load the truck. If you have say 12 or so gaylords of material a partial load maybe a option.

    Thanks JJ for your post
    The key is STACKING pallets to really get the full savings of freight. 12 pallets unstacked is about a half trailer load... not a big savings... sure there is over parcel but in the world of freight you actually may be better off shipping 2 or 4 skids.

  14. The Following 3 Users say Thank You for This Post by Ewasted:


  15. #9
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    949
    Thanks
    593
    Thanked 1,370 Times in 422 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JJinLV View Post
    My first job driving a lift was at a supermarket almost twenty years ago and there we unloaded the trucks with a walker and a pallet jack. Lugging those full pallets of milk with a pallet jack was...unenviable lol. Worst injury ever seen anyone incur with a pallet jack, thankfully, is running over their toes while going backwards and not paying attention or banging their shins. But absolutely anytime you put a couple thousand pounds on wheels danger is just incredibly possible. There are also smaller electric jacks that are sized properly for use inside a trailer that are safer in most aspects but potentially more dangerous too. With care, practice and good habits loading a truck safely even with a pallet jack can be one of the less risky parts of scrap. Then again in an industry that includes a lot of sharp things, heavy things, toxic things and power tools perhaps that isn't saying much lol
    My assumption was most folks who don't have a dock, don't have a forklift or pallet jack would not know what they don't know. Sharp and heavy things are quite ordinary in our space, yes. The perils of loading freight, not so much. Just wanted to shed some light for consideration to safety when folks change their processes.

  16. The Following 4 Users say Thank You for This Post by Ewasted:


  17. #10
    JJinLV started this thread.
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    904
    Thanks
    2,528
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 564 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ewasted View Post
    My assumption was most folks who don't have a dock, don't have a forklift or pallet jack would not know what they don't know. Sharp and heavy things are quite ordinary in our space, yes. The perils of loading freight, not so much. Just wanted to shed some light for consideration to safety when folks change their processes.
    Great point!

  18. The Following 2 Users say Thank You for This Post by JJinLV:


  19. #11
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    949
    Thanks
    593
    Thanked 1,370 Times in 422 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JJinLV View Post
    Great point!
    Thanks! At the end of the day sitting behind a desk and saying "here is how you can/should do things" isn't the best route.
    We are asset based processor not a broker so we can considerable value in the whole process to our customers because, well, been there done that over the last 15 years. Started out with a 1000 square foot unit, no dock... loaded trucks with a 1970's hyster that was overqualified for the job in terms of capacity... So many things can happen... electric pallet jack used in inclement weather??? What about slip hazards?? So, so much to consider before just spending $600.

    I can put my money where my mouth is because we have had only 3 workplace injuries in nearly 15 years! Learning from those 3 (all minor) lead us to be extremely proactive... no injuries in the last 6 years! That is highly uncommon in this industry!

    LEAD with SAFETY!

  20. The Following 5 Users say Thank You for This Post by Ewasted:


  21. #12
    JJinLV started this thread.
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    904
    Thanks
    2,528
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 564 Posts
    I've trained a whole slew of folks over the years on both fork and electric pallet jack operation inside and outside including in Chicago and Detroit during the winter and am on a lift at least half of every workday. all this starts with safety and have never had an injury thankfully. Guess I was approaching this from the idea that folks wouldn't take on something beyond their capacity. Would be happy to team up on safety tips though there really is no subtitute for actual training.

  22. The Following 2 Users say Thank You for This Post by JJinLV:


  23. #13
    mikeinreco's Avatar
    SMF Badges of Honor


    Member since
    Dec 2011
    Location
    TENNESSEE
    Posts
    4,572
    Thanks
    1,194
    Thanked 4,725 Times in 2,171 Posts
    Those of us who are on the bigger end of a small time operation deal with this dilemma every day.....we try to accumulate as much as we can until it just overwhelms us then it has to go somewhere.....

  24. The Following 2 Users say Thank You for This Post by mikeinreco:


  25. #14
    JJinLV started this thread.
    SMF Badges of Honor

    Member since
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    904
    Thanks
    2,528
    Thanked 1,442 Times in 564 Posts
    Those carriers that offer 28' trailers might be a partial solution. They tend to be less expensive and hold a maximum of 26 gaylords (more likely 24) double stacked, or 13 single stacked gaylords/pallets. Inexpensive but heavy items like UPS's can make up a lot of weight, as can towers, switches and servers (presumably if they're not new enough to harvest parts nor old enough to be scrap gold mines).

  26. #15
    hills's Avatar
    SMF Badges of Honor


    Member since
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    801
    Thanks
    575
    Thanked 896 Times in 488 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeinreco View Post
    Those of us who are on the bigger end of a small time operation deal with this dilemma every day.....we try to accumulate as much as we can until it just overwhelms us then it has to go somewhere.....
    Maybe network with the other businesses in your area that have a forklift ?

    It's done all the time in this area.

  27. The Following 3 Users say Thank You for This Post by hills:


  28. #16
    mikeinreco's Avatar
    SMF Badges of Honor


    Member since
    Dec 2011
    Location
    TENNESSEE
    Posts
    4,572
    Thanks
    1,194
    Thanked 4,725 Times in 2,171 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by hills View Post
    Maybe network with the other businesses in your area that have a forklift ?

    It's done all the time in this area.
    Have done that before but most of the "mom and pop" places have been run out of business.....Working towards getting things more streamlined but material continues to roll in.....Could have worse problems I guess.....

  29. The Following User Says Thank You to mikeinreco for This Post:



  30. Similar threads on the Scrap Metal Forum

    1. Got a nice truckload of E-scrap today
      By kss in forum A Day in the Life of a Scrapper
      Replies: 30
      Last Post: 01-24-2020, 05:54 PM
    2. Full timers - How did you decide to go full time?
      By alekwb in forum A Day in the Life of a Scrapper
      Replies: 22
      Last Post: 12-27-2013, 09:00 AM
    3. Replies: 4
      Last Post: 06-14-2013, 09:01 AM
    4. Found a whole truckload of steel in the trash yesterday
      By fiat128 in forum A Day in the Life of a Scrapper
      Replies: 16
      Last Post: 02-20-2013, 06:05 AM

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

 
Browse the Most Recent Threads
On SMF In THIS CATEGORY.





OR

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

The Scrap Metal Forum

    The Scrap Metal Forum is the #1 scrap metal recycling community in the world. Here we talk about the scrap metal business, making money, where we connect with other scrappers, scrap yards and more.

SMF on Facebook and Twitter

Twitter Facebook