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Ac loops/ central ac units

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  1. #1
    mike1 started this thread.
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    Ac loops/ central ac units

    Hi was wanting to know of a easy way to get a loops out of the steel ends when I cut them off from the inside with a sawzall?. They usually just pull out but lately they have been stubborn. I was thinking maybe a screw driver in the holes and a haee wouldpop them out?. Otherwise the guy at the yard said I could get electric motor price for the ends at .20lb good or bad or do these have a special category?

    I also took apart a thing that looked like this lV? It's a A frame of some sort I have never seen one until yesterday?.

    The central ac units that are shaped like a u those are 15lbs with ends cut off now what about the tall central ac units do they weigh the same or slightly more or less?. The guy at work said they rangefrom 2 ton ,2.5 ton and 3 ton is there a way to tell what ton it is if your just getting the radiators from them ?

    Then we have A frames the ones with 3 rows on them meaning if you cut the loops off then ends they have 3 rows of tubes are 15lbs with ends cut off now I don't know how a smaller 2 row A frame would be slightly less I'd say. Do they get any bigger than 3 rows?


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    CopperMiner's Avatar
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    Usually, I'll cut the macaroni loops first, then I pull on the steel ends and smash them with a hammer and pull them again 'til the steel ends fell down. I am still searching for an easier way. In the worst case, maybe use an angle grinder to cut around the stubborn ones and get rid of the steel plate and then complete the job by another cut on the other side of the steel plate?
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    I dunno Mike.

    Most of the value is probably in the clean copper/aluminum radiator. That's quick and easy enough to do.

    The ends are more work. Your time is valuable. It might be more efficient to to sell the the dirty ends off at the electric motor price and be done with it.

    Turn-n-burn !

    Take it in .... and bang it out .... just as fast as you can without hurting yourself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike1 View Post
    They usually just pull out but lately they have been stubborn.
    Okay ... so they used to be easy but now they are hard. What changed ?

    The reason i asked is because i'm wondering if you might have changed your sawzall blade. A sawzall blade with lots of small teeth will cut slower but give you a cleaner cut.

    Going to a coarse blade with fewer but bigger teeth might cut faster .... but give you a more ragged cut. That would make the noodles a lot harder to get out.

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    If you cant get the noodles off the steel plate that means you have to much copper tube / alum rad behind the steel. Do as Copperminer said, cut the noodles off first and then remove the steel. I know some ends have a lip or are flared out so you cant cut evenly with the steel ends, But what i do is take some extra time and bend the flared steel out of the way with plyers. that extra minute or so will save you time from messing with the acr ends that wont come out.

    Also, Acr ends should go for more than electric motor price. here its a .35/lb difference.... motors are .25/lb and Acr ends are .60/lb

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    Quote Originally Posted by greytruck View Post
    If you cant get the noodles off the steel plate that means you have to much copper tube / alum rad behind the steel. Do as Copperminer said, cut the noodles off first and then remove the steel. I know some ends have a lip or are flared out so you cant cut evenly with the steel ends, But what i do is take some extra time and bend the flared steel out of the way with plyers. that extra minute or so will save you time from messing with the acr ends that wont come out.

    Also, Acr ends should go for more than electric motor price. here its a .35/lb difference.... motors are .25/lb and Acr ends are .60/lb
    Either way ... i think you really need to focus on getting a clean cut that's flush with the steel end.

    The reason i say that is because the tolerances between the outside diameter of the copper tubing and the inside of the hole on the steel are pretty tight. They are probably no more than a few thousandths of an inch different from one another.

    It all comes apart easily enough if everything is just right.

    It's a different story if the copper ends are ragged. The job gets difficult. It's about like trying to dislodge a wet Saint Bernard that tried to come in through the cat door !

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    Quote Originally Posted by hills View Post
    Either way ... i think you really need to focus on getting a clean cut that's flush with the steel end.

    The reason i say that is because the tolerances between the outside diameter of the copper tubing and the inside of the hole on the steel are pretty tight. They are probably no more than a few thousandths of an inch different from one another.

    It all comes apart easily enough if everything is just right.

    It's a different story if the copper ends are ragged. The job gets difficult. It's about like trying to dislodge a wet Saint Bernard that tried to come in through the cat door !
    Yes a flush cut is key. especially the coils with more layers of tubing used. like the ones with four or five rows of noodles. Using a sawzall is to violent and hard to keep it from vearing off corse. i started using a portable bandsaw to cut the noodles off. It works a lot faster, and you can control the cut angle and the speed a lot better. Only thing about the bandsaw is that the guard on the back end gets hung up on the steel when you first start cutting so you have to watch for that. But other wise its a lot easyer

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    Quote Originally Posted by greytruck View Post
    Yes a flush cut is key. especially the coils with more layers of tubing used. like the ones with four or five rows of noodles. Using a sawzall is to violent and hard to keep it from vearing off corse. i started using a portable bandsaw to cut the noodles off. It works a lot faster, and you can control the cut angle and the speed a lot better. Only thing about the bandsaw is that the guard on the back end gets hung up on the steel when you first start cutting so you have to watch for that. But other wise its a lot easyer
    I have never seen 4 or 5 rows what are those on?. I think it's my blade I need to replace it I did just go through 7 A frames and 5 central ac's. I'm getting another 7 A frames and maybe 7 centrals I'm not sure. So do you guys break down the fan motors ? Last time I took A frames 7 and 5 centrals I got 351$ the centrals I had just the rads no fan or the compressor or the front thing with the copper winding on it. I had a couple 3 row A frames and some 2 rows I think 2 rows are standard I'm not sure. Last central ac I got was 15lbs with ends off about the same as a 3 row A frame. I'm going to get a 3 ton central so it's probably more than 15lbs I bet. Do central ac's usually only have one radiator or 2? Most of mine I have come across had only one.

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    Always cut the ends off on the OUTSIDE of the steel plate to get clean copper. If there is a steel flange in the way either hammer or bend it back out of the way. Usually 1 or 2 whacks with a hammer will knock the steel off the coil after the ends are cut off. It takes me 5 to 10 seconds to cut an end off on my wood cutting 14" vertical bandsaw with a metal blade. Or a 4" grinder with a cutoff blade (I prefer diamond) makes a cleaner cut than a sawzall.

  16. #10
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    I agree with what some have said here. I use a sawzall and cut the ends off from behind the steel plate. If a long flange is in the way I may cut on the outside of the steel plate . A short end flange can be bent out of the way with pliers . Cut while keeping your blade touching the steel plate. The ends should come out of the steel plate easily with a screwdriver if cut even with the steel plate.



    Of course I have tonnage of stuff to clean, but I treat it as if it the last stuff available on earth. Ha. So, I would never sell those steel ends with the copper still in them.


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