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  1. #1
    src3collector started this thread.
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    What safety precautions does everyone here use? and why?

    A recent post about using an angle grinder got me started on a search about safety and hazardous/toxic materials when scrapping. Seems alot of info is pretty scattered and there's a link in many posts to a very detailed (and overwhelming) list of toxic substances. I just want to do a simple poll of what everyone uses (safety equipment), where they scrap (if certain items are only done outdoors for example) or some things you just outright avoid.

    Right now I'm just working either out of my garage or storage unit (being in Dallas though once the triple digit heat gets here I'll mainly be working inside my garage). I won't do anything inside my house as I'm too paranoid, ESPECIALLY now that I have a Pregnant wife! I always wear Mechanix gloves and I wear regular eyeglasses. I also turn a fan on inside my garage but that's more for cooling since I don't have the garage doors open.

    I'm also thinking about wearing a full face respirator. Sounds like overkill but I tend to be paranoid and I don't really know what's in that smell that comes out when a low grade board breaks. (I'm sure everyone knows the smell I'm talking about). Part of this paranoia stems from my time in the air force (which is where I have my full face respirator from, I just have to find the replacement filters). I worked on the F-117 Stealth and there were things I worked on that required a full body Tyvek suit with full face respirator, gloves and the suit taped to the gloves so there was no gap. Once I responded to a ground emergency where a drag chute malfunctioned and ripped through a rudder. Nothing burning and no chemicals, just the material that makes a rudder was shredded, and just for that we were required to were full face respirators.

    That brings me to one final story. You may remember during the Bosnia conflict in the late 90's there was an F-117 shot down. Made news since someone downed a "Stealth" aircraft, truth is they just got lucky. Anyway a video came out showing them all dancing around and on top of the downed and BURNING F-117. We kind of laughed at the time since they were just breathing in all kinds of toxins and are all probably dead or dying of cancer by now.

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  3. #2
    EcoSafe's Avatar
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    Sounds like you have some common sense. That's probably all you need ,It will tell you what is safe and what is needed as far as safety. Yes the visible and invisible particles from working with Boards and their components are very bad to breathe aside from the smell.

    Angle grinders because of their speed can be very dangerous and get out of hand so quickly you can get a life threatening gash near your inner thigh area or inner upper arm area very quickly. The blades are composition material and can shatter with out warning at any time so face /eye protection is mandatory.

    Of course this is all common sense and why common sense is such an important ingredient in a scrappers tool box.
    "anyone who thinks scrappin is easy money ain't doin it right!"

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  5. #3
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    If you wear glasses, you should get yourself some prescription safety glasses. Not only are the lenses better, but they tend to be fitted closer to the eyeball (less chance of something bouncing off your face and into your eye). Of course, goggles or a face shield are even better.

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  7. #4
    src3collector started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Otto View Post
    If you wear glasses, you should get yourself some prescription safety glasses. Not only are the lenses better, but they tend to be fitted closer to the eyeball (less chance of something bouncing off your face and into your eye). Of course, goggles or a face shield are even better.
    I honestly never even knew they make those. I just looked them up online and found a site that has some pretty cool designs, I'm going to have to look into getting a pair. Found this gem too - they have a pair with a "bone conduction microphone" and bluetooth that picks up your voice through your nose! Sounds like something that came out of a Bond movie! Here's the link:
    BonSayOn Prescription Bluetooth Safety Glasses, #S302 (RX)

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  9. #5
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    For me, it's pretty basic common-sense stuff. As a core buyer, the most hazardous things I deal with are batteries (acid) and sharp edges on hacked-off converters. Heavy gloves are a must. I still get in a hurry, and occasionally get a harsh reminder of that rule in the form of a finger slice or metal wicker With the batteries, I'm pretty good at remembering to inspect each one for leaking acid before picking it up, even with my battery grabber.

    I never run my chop saw without goggles AND gloves. A hot spark in the eye is no fun, been there. Chop saws also like to occasionally grab and throw something, just to see if you're on your toes. Therefore, I'm always aware if there's anyone else in the shop, and make sure they're out of the "line of fire" when I'm cutting. Yes, the guard is on my saw, but it doesn't stop everything from flying.

    I'm also very careful not to breathe in any dust from broken or loose converter substrate material. Along with the precious metals that make it valuable, that ceramic honeycomb brick contains other stuff that will stay with you forever if it gets into your lungs, much like asbestos dust.

    My first and best safety rule is this- If it looks, seems or even feels like it might be a bad idea, it probably is! Take 30 seconds, get the right tool, tighten that blade or clamp, put on those goggles or do whatever it is that you KNOW you should do. I live by this simple rule, and knock on wood, I don't get myself busted up all that often.
    Sparrow Metals- Automotive core and converter buyer in Central PA since 2012.

    www.sparrowmetals.com

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    Recently had a request for a quote from a company that does Fire Sprinkler Systems, attached to the quote was a report on the building and safety issues. It stated that the pipes had all been painted and had high levels of lead.
    Did some checking on line and found out that as soon as you start moving it around, the paint breaks apart and the dust is very harmful. Also found out if I was to pick up the scrap and throw it on the scrap pile at the scrap yard, I could be held responsible for all costs of testing, treatment and loss of income to all those I exposed to it.
    A lot of old pipes and equipment was painted with lead based paint, never gave it much thought till I got this quote, I rejected the job, not worth risking everything for a few dollars of scrap and something to watch out for in the future.

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    I always wear cut resistant gloves. They are not too bulky and if they fit you right give you pretty good dexterity. They also allow me to grip stuff better. And EVERY time I don't wear them I get my fingers cut. (Must be used to the protection all the time) Using a grinder or chop saw I used standard PPEs.

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    having a clean work bench or where ever your working. Sounds stupid and I have had people say its a waste of time an they should "just get the job done" but when you have a mess where your working you can have hidden dangers so I am about having the work area as clean as it can be (with in reason..but still)
    My company name is Easy Recycle
    My Name Stephan Harz
    My YouTube page

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  17. #9
    british's Avatar
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    I just tell the women my name is SRC3collector and i'm from Aubrey..............Happy Child Support

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    having a clean work bench or where ever your working. Sounds stupid and I have had people say its a waste of time an they should "just get the job done" but when you have a mess where your working you can have

    Full article at Scrap Metal Forum: http://www.scrapmetalforum.com/scrap...#ixzz32yU8KTXT
    I cannot stand a messy work area. A place for everything and everything in it's place. I wonder how many minutes or hours some people spend looking for tools.

  19. #11
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    I don't have much of a setup yet, so the biggest thing I do is try to stick to things I know I can do safely. I've got no power tools to worry with. My very first scrap run, I couldn't even afford gloves! Got a nasty gash on my wrist and I wear gloves all the time now. I want to work safely, but I also have a tight budget, so for now I'm trying to stick to things I can scrap safely.

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  21. #12
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    For me common sense is the first and most important safety tool. I wear gloves, goggles as a minimum and working in a dusty environment a respirator. I'm in south central utah where we have several cases of hantavirus infections each year. If I'm working in an area where there are mice droppings a respirator is used no question. Then it depends on what I'm doing, hard hat, steel toed shoes/boots, bee/wasp spray. I'm not above of turning down sketchy jobs.

  22. #13
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    Safety glasses clear and dark, gloves, steel toe boots, at all times for me. Even if your not creating sparks, picking up dirty stuff with wind blowing can get something lodged in your eye. I usually have at least a long sleeve cotton work shirt, hard hat, and hearing protection in the truck when I need it, a respirator at home for the jobs i know im gonna need it, and even if its not the best having a good first aid kit and fire extinguisher/water in the truck is generally a good idea. I used to have like a professional med kit in the truck but that stayed in a truck i sold down in texas. Now i just got cheaper ones and a turniqute? I got from the army. In colder months i also try to keep matches and warmer clothes in the truck as well. Usually you never need most of that stuff but when accidents happen if your preparred you can minimize the damage. If your unpreparred even minor accidents can turn disaterous real quick.
    Also i never do anything inside my house. I'll retrieve things from the houses of others but try to take everything out in one piece and tear it apart outside. And if you see mouse poop wear respirator or dont mess with it.

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    Common sense

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  25. #15
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    I wear safety glasses and a face shield for my eyes , gloves always and I have certain scrapping clothes , I have a half face respirator if it is needed
    Old dogs care about you even when you make mistakes;
    God bless little children while they're still too young to hate

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    I make sure my beer is well away from my work area so I don't knock it over.

    Out of clutter, find simplicity. --Albert Einstein

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