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Identifying inconel metal

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    fecual started this thread.
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    Identifying inconel metal

    I recently got paid for removing a large industrial catalyzing oven. The attached pictures show it being attached to my crane's hook, and later a piece of it in my yard.

    What it is is a large catalyzing oven that had titanium dioxide catalyst and was used to burn off industrial paint and clean up the exhaust gases to be EPA compliant.

    Inside, there are heavy grates that are non-magnetic. In addition, there is a big accordion-like setup, about 4x4x8 feet long, that looks kind of like an accordion and is also non-magnetic. It is probably a heat exchanger of some kind.



    I am suspecting that they may be not stainless but inconel. So, I wanted to know if I can test them without going to a scrap yard with XRF gun. Is there some way to positively identify inconel, like try to melt salt on top of it with an oxidizing flame from a torch and see if it corrodes? Something that can distinguish it from regular stainless?

    It looks grey.

    Thanks
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    Last edited by fecual; 07-22-2016 at 08:43 PM.


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    Very easy solution to get the first basic question out of the way. Put a grinder to it and see if it puts out a short red (ish) spark . If it is you have a high temp high nickel alloy. This wont exactly tell you what alloy specific it is but will at least tell you if you have something with better than 304/ 316ss nickel content, You might want to take a piece of stainless steel 300 series and grind that first so you can see the vast difference in the spark if it is alloy. If it is alloy I would assume a yard with a gun would come to you to shoot it if its that heavy of a piece. Good luck and may the spark be short and red

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    fecual started this thread.
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    Thanks. I will do that, it is a great idea.

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    fecual started this thread.
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    Here a small picture of the grate and a link to the big picture:

    http://yabe.chudov.com/HEAVY-Stainle...9/DSC_0059.JPG

    Keep in mind that the grate that you see spent 20-30 years in a fire.
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    Looks like it could be titanium.




    Last edited by alloy2; 07-24-2016 at 01:01 AM.
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    fecual started this thread.
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    Titanium, that would be super surprising!

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    Quote Originally Posted by fecual View Post
    Titanium, that would be super surprising!
    5:03 Saprk test titanium,


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    fecual started this thread.
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    I took a couple more pictures. One of the heat exchanger and other of three triangular pieces from that exchanger, compared to regular stainless. I burned both stainless and the mystery metal with TIG torch without argon.

    https://www.machinerymoverschicago.c...-exchanger.jpg

    https://www.machinerymoverschicago.com/tmp/inconel.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by fecual View Post
    I took a couple more pictures. One of the heat exchanger and other of three triangular pieces from that exchanger, compared to regular stainless. I burned both stainless and the mystery metal with TIG torch without argon.

    https://www.machinerymoverschicago.c...-exchanger.jpg

    https://www.machinerymoverschicago.com/tmp/inconel.jpg
    Doesn't tell me much, take youre grinder and hit it the sparks are a brilliant white.

    Titanium once exp[osed to the atmospher, a pasivated coating forms almost imediatly, if you do not own a grinder take something sharp and scibe a gouge into the metal the newly eposed metal will form a pasivsated coating almost imediatly.

    Another thing stainless steel will become slightly magnetic at a weld or cut zone if you had made the cut with a plasma torch or simply melted a glob as you have using your tig the metal if it is stainless would become magnetic. Titanium does not share this trait.

    Type III Color Anodize

    Techmetals Type III color titanium anodize (TM- MedaDize Color) produces an oxide layer of variable thickness. This oxide layer reflects and refracts light waves which in turn cause the perception of color to the human eye. Color perception is caused by light interference between the oxide layer and base metal. Observed color is based on the thickness of the TiO2 “oxide” layer that grows during the anodize process. Since the oxide layer thickness can be controlled a wide array of colors can be produced without the use of dyes. Interference color wavelengths are formed by the refraction of light off of and through the thin titanium oxide layer. It is not the oxide itself that is perceived by the viewer, but its effect on light waves.



    Last edited by alloy2; 07-24-2016 at 07:20 PM.

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    Inconel metals are high strength material with supreme corrosion and oxidation resistance properties. If we go specific form of inconel for ex- let's say its Inconel 625 then its features would be:-

    1.
    prevents attack in alkalis, marine & fresh water and natural salts

    2. Good resistance to oxidizing and non oxidizing media

    3. Prevents pitting and crevice corrosion and SCC

    Learn more about inconel 625 here:
    super-metals.com/alloy/inconel-625/
    Last edited by heanjiametals; 03-28-2017 at 03:16 PM.


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