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  1. #1
    philshark2 started this thread.
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    Is this propeller worth more than just scrap?

    I found this propeller in a field next to my house and was wondering if its in good enough condition to be sold, or should I throw it in my steel pile?



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    Is this propeller worth more than just scrap?

    are you sure it is steel? most propellers are non ferrous, with brass being the favorite
    Currently looking for a job in or related to scrap/recycling. Relocation is possible for the right offer.

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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattInTheHat View Post
    are you sure it is steel? most propellers are non ferrous, with brass being the favorite
    I'm thinking aluminum. When I had a boat in the late 90's it was aluminum.

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  6. #4
    t00nces2's Avatar
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    My guess would be stainless. Brass is soft enough that the brushing would have worn off having been used as much as the grease and wear on the spline indicates.

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  8. #5
    philshark2 started this thread.
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    I checked with a magnet and it stuck on the blades but havent checked inside

    EDIT: its magnetic inside and out
    Last edited by philshark2; 02-21-2016 at 07:05 PM.

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    Scrap.

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    Al, SS and Bronze are used in props. Most likely it mostly SS, the hub area normally has a material that works like a shear pin. If its relatively light weight then Al but likely SS. The bigger boats often have Bronze props.

    If you have a boat yard near you its possible but highly unlikely to have any value above shred. If you are able to push out the hub then you could have clean SS. 73, Mike
    "Profit begins when you buy NOT when you sell." {quote passed down to me from a wise man}

    Now go beat the copper out of something, Miked

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  12. #8
    philshark2 started this thread.
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    Well the entire thing is magnetic even the middle.

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    That's a bit surprising but I do boat in a saltwater area. I guess that answers your question. Keep scraping and learning as I do. Mike

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    If you do ebay, you might try listing it as steampunk. Never can tell.

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    Quote Originally Posted by philshark2 View Post
    I found this propeller in a field next to my house and was wondering if its in good enough condition to be sold, or should I throw it in my steel pile?
    The splined centre hub looks to be cracked, if it is the prop is junk regardless of what it is made from. That centre hub is usually set into a moulded rubber bushing to absorb shock should the prop strike something solid thus preventing damage to the drive train.
    The art of survival is a story that never ends. American Hustle.

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  17. #12
    hobo finds's Avatar
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    sell it for more than scrap! Someone will buy it. How much dose it weigh?

  18. #13
    philshark2 started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hobo finds View Post
    sell it for more than scrap! Someone will buy it. How much dose it weigh?
    It weighs 9 pounds

  19. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by philshark2 View Post
    It weighs 9 pounds
    Sell it at a yard sale for $4

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    Mercury Marine 48-72764A4 Stainless Steel Boat Propeller 17 pitch

    Mercury 48-72764A4 at PropMD

    "How to tell if a prop is stainless"

    "Bite it, if you leave teeth marks it is aluminum (don't do this with the motor running in gear)"

    "Here's a test! Drop the freaking thing on your foot and see how many bones break!!! If you can walk it's aluminum!!"

    "Austenitic Grades
    All austenitic grades have very low magnetic permeabilities and hence show almost no response to a magnet when in the annealed condition; the situation is, however, far less clear when these steels have been cold worked by wire drawing, rolling or even centreless grinding, shot blasting or heavy polishing. After substantial cold working Grade 304 may exhibit quite strong response to a magnet, whereas Grades 310 and 316 will in most instances still be almost totally non-responsive.

    The change in magnetic response is due to atomic lattice straining and formation of martensite. In general, the higher the nickel to chromium ratio the more stable is the austenitic structure and the less magnetic response that will be induced by cold work. Magnetic response can therefore be used as a method for sorting grades of stainless steel, but considerable caution needs to be exercised.


    Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5% chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties - essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will 'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels, scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel underneath.

    In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen the oxide layer.

    As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.

    So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic. "

    The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum - View Single Post - How to tell if a prop is stainless?

    the full thread - How to tell if a prop is stainless? - The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

    ebay completed auction on a reworked 48-72764A4 17p - sold for 189.00 - Mercury Honda 75 90 115 125 Outboard 17 Pitch Stainless Boat Propeller SS Prop | eBay
    Last edited by oldtoothlessbassmaster; 02-22-2016 at 08:27 PM.

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  22. #16
    brandon's Avatar
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    make it into the base of a lamp
    My fortune cookie said:
    You discover treasures where others see nothing unusual.

  23. #17
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    Thanks oldtoothlessbasmaster for explaining that about stainless steel. It just justifies my anger at the sob at my local yard tossing my knives in the shred pile. I spent about an hour or more busting the handles off around 50 Made in China knifes, you know, the ones in the cheap block sets. Almost all said SS on them. He yanked them out of my SS bucket with his big SUPER magnet and tossed them in his huge shred bin before I could protest. I was like WTF!! Those SAY Stainless Steel !! He said with a straight face “They lie”



    Last time I went there.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Faceball View Post
    Thanks oldtoothlessbasmaster for explaining that about stainless steel. It just justifies my anger at the sob at my local yard tossing my knives in the shred pile. I spent about an hour or more busting the handles off around 50 Made in China knifes, you know, the ones in the cheap block sets. Almost all said SS on them. He yanked them out of my SS bucket with his big SUPER magnet and tossed them in his huge shred bin before I could protest. I was like WTF!! Those SAY Stainless Steel !! He said with a straight face “They lie”



    Last time I went there.
    Several yards here buy dirty stainless steel, that's where I put my magnetic stainless, other yards say "if it sticks to a magnet then it goes in with the steel"!

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  26. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faceball View Post
    Thanks oldtoothlessbasmaster for explaining that about stainless steel. It just justifies my anger at the sob at my local yard tossing my knives in the shred pile. I spent about an hour or more busting the handles off around 50 Made in China knifes, you know, the ones in the cheap block sets. Almost all said SS on them. He yanked them out of my SS bucket with his big SUPER magnet and tossed them in his huge shred bin before I could protest. I was like WTF!! Those SAY Stainless Steel !! He said with a straight face “They lie”



    Last time I went there.
    I heard a worker at a scrap yard call magnetic stainless, "chinese stainless". I liked that description so I adopted it.

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  28. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldtoothlessbassmaster View Post
    Mercury Marine 48-72764A4 Stainless Steel Boat Propeller 17 pitch

    Mercury 48-72764A4 at PropMD

    "How to tell if a prop is stainless"

    "Bite it, if you leave teeth marks it is aluminum (don't do this with the motor running in gear)"

    "Here's a test! Drop the freaking thing on your foot and see how many bones break!!! If you can walk it's aluminum!!"

    "Austenitic Grades
    All austenitic grades have very low magnetic permeabilities and hence show almost no response to a magnet when in the annealed condition; the situation is, however, far less clear when these steels have been cold worked by wire drawing, rolling or even centreless grinding, shot blasting or heavy polishing. After substantial cold working Grade 304 may exhibit quite strong response to a magnet, whereas Grades 310 and 316 will in most instances still be almost totally non-responsive.

    The change in magnetic response is due to atomic lattice straining and formation of martensite. In general, the higher the nickel to chromium ratio the more stable is the austenitic structure and the less magnetic response that will be induced by cold work. Magnetic response can therefore be used as a method for sorting grades of stainless steel, but considerable caution needs to be exercised.


    Stainless steels are a very broad group of metals. The name was adopted as a generic term for steel alloys with a minimum of 10.5% chromium. The chromium gives the steel its 'stainless' properties - essentially corrosion resistance. On the surface of the metal, a very thin chromium-rich oxide layer is formed which is inert - i.e. it prevents the steel from rusting. The advantage of stainless steels over plated steels is that, if scratched or damaged, the steel will 'self-repair' as a new oxide layer is formed. In plated steels, scratches in the plate will often lead to corrosion of the steel underneath.

    In general, the higher the proportion of chromium, the stronger the corrosion resistance of the steel. In addition to chromium, other metals are added to give the steel particular properties such as strength and malleability. Specifically nickel is used to strengthen the oxide layer.

    As for whether they are magnetic, the answer is that it depends. There are several families of stainless steels with different physical properties. A basic stainless steel has a 'ferritic' structure and is magnetic. These are formed from the addition of chromium and can be hardened through the addition of carbon (making them 'martensitic') and are often used in cutlery. However, the most common stainless steels are 'austenitic' - these have a higher chromium content and nickel is also added. It is the nickel which modifies the physical structure of the steel and makes it non-magnetic.

    So the answer is yes, the magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic. "

    The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum - View Single Post - How to tell if a prop is stainless?

    the full thread - How to tell if a prop is stainless? - The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum

    ebay completed auction on a reworked 48-72764A4 17p - sold for 189.00 - Mercury Honda 75 90 115 125 Outboard 17 Pitch Stainless Boat Propeller SS Prop | eBay
    Good info on stainless steel, so we're gonna bump this thread.

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