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Great finds today

| A Day in the Life of a Scrapper
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    Great finds today

    Notable items include

    2x plastic wheeled trash cans (they had signs on them that said "free/garbage", I didnt steal them lol). will use these to hold my ICW and alum bits
    1x 5hp powerwasher,
    2x lawn mowers (one started right up),
    2x weedwackers....
    and my favorite find, a haro bmx bike... always wanted one as a kid but they were too expensive .... now I have one. inflated the tires, put the chain back on, lubed it, and rode it around the block. love it.




    Last edited by kss; 05-20-2020 at 07:00 PM.

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    andyheim's Avatar
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    That bike is a huge score. Like many things, they’ve become quite a hot commodity. Hard to find by me currently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by andyheim View Post
    That bike is a huge score. Like many things, they’ve become quite a hot commodity. Hard to find by me currently.

    Yea I looked it up, they were $400 new. This one is a 2001 model year. I see a few on the internet for sale for around $150 in really nice shape. This one is a little more worn but it still works and rides great. Not going to sell it though, at least not yet! Might try to get back into biking, but not sure that Ill have the time. May end up selling it down the line a bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kss View Post
    Yea I looked it up, they were $400 new. This one is a 2001 model year. I see a few on the internet for sale for around $150 in really nice shape. This one is a little more worn but it still works and rides great. Not going to sell it though, at least not yet! Might try to get back into biking, but not sure that Ill have the time. May end up selling it down the line a bit.
    I dont resale, nor will i pretend too lol, But my cousin does sometimes and he said you can get alot more parting out bikes than selling them whole. Just a heads up

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    kss started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by greytruck View Post
    I dont resale, nor will i pretend too lol, But my cousin does sometimes and he said you can get alot more parting out bikes than selling them whole. Just a heads up

    Interesting thought. Im sure this is probably true on good bikes with good components, but MOST (this one being a rare exception) that I find are not name-brand or good bikes. Most are walmart brands (huffy, mongoose, kent, etc). Some times I get some nicer ones. Reguardless I have a "bike guy" who fixes and resells that I deal with.

    He buys all the bikes off me, usually $10/bike, if its a nicer one, sometimes more. Sold one that was a "specialized" brand bike (with no chain or rear derailer) for $75, sold a few ones to hime for $30-50/each. But I just like that I can always count on this guy to take them all, even if I could get more selling individually. Its worth it for me to not have the hasle.... just text him when I have a truck full and we make a deal and exchange. He even gives me all the un-used/scrap bike/parts that he does need/want/ or cant sell.

    I dont usually like reselling either so parting out isnt something I would probably want to spend time on.... usually I just want the stuff gone lol

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    kss started this thread.
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    Well today I was going around my normal areas looking for stuff and stopped at a house after spotting some metal at the curb. As I was loading the stuff I noticed there was an HVAC van in the drive way. When the HVAC guy saw me taking the stuff (and probably the load of stuff already in my truck bed) he asked "Hey would you want an AC too?"..... of course I said "Sure!". He even helped me load it!

    This is my first AC unit. I usually do not mess with ACs because of the freon. I dont want the headache of dealing with freon and stuff. But seeing as this was from an HVAC guy and fully detached, I am ASSUMING there is no freon in this thing? Its got open ended pipes all around it so there doesnt seem like there even could be any refrigerant in there right?

    I am going to disassemble this weekend probably. But a quick question for anyone, can the whole area that the refrigerant goes through be ACR? Am I better off cutting the copper ends off (and if I do can whats left still go as ACR?)?? Just looking for some advice on tackling this thing as its my first time on one of these whole home ACs.

    Pics attached.

    Edit: after some youtube searches ( ) I think I may have all the answers I need on taking this thing apart. but never hurts to get input from here!


    Last edited by kss; 06-01-2020 at 06:56 PM.

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    Congrats on the score. Word of warning, not all hvac techs are qualified to remove the Freon and it is possible to remove the unit with the Freon still trapped. If you cut into it and it starts hissing, pray the climate change authorities are not around.
    Give back more to this world than we take.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patriot76 View Post
    Congrats on the score. Word of warning, not all hvac techs are qualified to remove the Freon and it is possible to remove the unit with the Freon still trapped. If you cut into it and it starts hissing, pray the climate change authorities are not around.

    Idk man, this guys van look super fancy and new lol....... I feel like he wouldnt be any type of shady guy that wouldnt take the freon out. Is there anyway I can tell, for sure, before cutting into anything that it is in fact, empty? All the copper hoses on the backside are open/not plugged/not connected to anything when I got it so I had assumed it couldnt have any in it.... but would love some more assurance on that if you have any. I can upload some more pics if needed

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    To answer your second question, a strategy to consider is removing all of the screws. Use a sawzaw with a sharp blade to cut all of the exterior loops. These are #2. Using a sharp blades allows the removal of the metal end caps with a hammer. Sometimes they are aluminum and do not need to be removed. The sawzaw can make easy work of the copper tubing as well. All of the metal can be sprinkled in with your prepared instead of selling it as tin or worse yet as appliance metal. Just an idea.

    I only do 40-50 per year, but I sprinkle in the condensers in with my HMS to get top dollar. Some will break down the condenser, but it is nor worth my time with the current prices.

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  16. #10
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    Here are some more pics from the back with the cut/detached ends

    https://imgur.com/a/pam6mCO

  17. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patriot76 View Post
    To answer your second question, a strategy to consider is removing all of the screws. Use a sawzaw with a sharp blade to cut all of the exterior loops. These are #2. Using a sharp blades allows the removal of the metal end caps with a hammer. Sometimes they are aluminum and do not need to be removed. The sawzaw can make easy work of the copper tubing as well. All of the metal can be sprinkled in with your prepared instead of selling it as tin or worse yet as appliance metal. Just an idea.

    I only do 40-50 per year, but I sprinkle in the condensers in with my HMS to get top dollar. Some will break down the condenser, but it is nor worth my time with the current prices.

    Ok thanks for the info! I definetly will use a sawz-all and try that method for the loops for #2 copper. My scrap yard has a category "ACR - alum copper radiators" that I think is at like $0.70/lb right now that hopefully the rest of the radiator that the loops are cut off of (minus the steel part between the loops and the radiator) can go as. Additionally, I thought condensors can go as "sealed units" which I think are around $0.08/lb at my local yard where-as hms/#1 is only at $0.05/lb



    Here are some more pics from the back with the cut/detached ends, hopefully it is freon free

    https://imgur.com/a/pam6mCO



    Also, "
    I only do 40-50 per year", thats 40-50 more than I do per year lol! Your input is greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by kss; 06-01-2020 at 07:35 PM.

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    Gee ... the AC unit was a nice little score. It seems like every ACR is a little different but i like to cut the loops off with a circular saw that has a metal cutting blade installed. It gives a cleaner cut and makes it easier to pull apart. Sometimes the angle grinder w/ a 1/8" cutting wheel works better and other times the sawzall. The thing with the sawzall is that it's hard to clamp the ACR down because the aluminum fins are so soft. (You really should have two hands on a saw when you're cutting.)

    Not crazy about doing sealed units but that one looks bigger than average. I usually get about 2 lbs of oily #2 copper out of them but the yield on that one might be better. Might be worth trying just for the experience of having done one ?
    Last edited by hills; 06-02-2020 at 03:41 AM.

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  20. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hills View Post
    Gee ... the AC unit was a nice little score. It seems like every ACR is a little different but i like to cut the loops off with a circular saw that has a metal cutting blade installed. It gives a cleaner cut and makes it easier to pull apart. Sometimes the angle grinder w/ a 1/8" cutting wheel works better and other times the sawzall. The thing with the sawzall is that it's hard to clamp the ACR down because the aluminum fins are so soft. (You really should have two hands on a saw when you're cutting.)

    Not crazy about doing sealed units but that one looks bigger than average. I usually get about 2 lbs of oily #2 copper out of them but the yield on that one might be better. Might be worth trying just for the experience of having done one ?

    Thanks for the advice. I have seen some seal unit stuff go pretty poorly. I think they are filled with oil/liquid too and I dont really want to mess with that. My local yard has a "seal unit" category at the same price as electric motor. Ill probably just turn the whole thing in as that and not take it apart. For how big it is it actually seems like it shouldnt be too hard to get apart (the whole AC unit, not the sealed unit)

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    You're probably just as well off to take a pass on the sealed unit. They are filled with oil. I usually drilled a 1/4" hole in the bottom of them and let them drain into a pan for a week or so. None the less ... the teardown was still a messy job. Sealed units and old copper fuel lines are hard to do without getting covered in oil. It stinks too. I keep a separate 5 gal. pail outside for my oily copper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hills View Post
    You're probably just as well off to take a pass on the sealed unit. They are filled with oil. I usually drilled a 1/4" hole in the bottom of them and let them drain into a pan for a week or so. None the less ... the teardown was still a messy job. Sealed units and old copper fuel lines are hard to do without getting covered in oil. It stinks too. I keep a separate 5 gal. pail outside for my oily copper.
    Yea.... 100% going to pass on that lol. Not worth whatever few bucks of copper is in there for the trouble! Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kss View Post
    Well today I was going around my normal areas looking for stuff and stopped at a house after spotting some metal at the curb. As I was loading the stuff I noticed there was an HVAC van in the drive way. When the HVAC guy saw me taking the stuff (and probably the load of stuff already in my truck bed) he asked "Hey would you want an AC too?"..... of course I said "Sure!". He even helped me load it!

    This is my first AC unit. I usually do not mess with ACs because of the freon. I dont want the headache of dealing with freon and stuff. But seeing as this was from an HVAC guy and fully detached, I am ASSUMING there is no freon in this thing? Its got open ended pipes all around it so there doesnt seem like there even could be any refrigerant in there right?

    I am going to disassemble this weekend probably. But a quick question for anyone, can the whole area that the refrigerant goes through be ACR? Am I better off cutting the copper ends off (and if I do can whats left still go as ACR?)?? Just looking for some advice on tackling this thing as its my first time on one of these whole home ACs.

    Pics attached.

    Edit: after some youtube searches ( ) I think I may have all the answers I need on taking this thing apart. but never hurts to get input from here!


    The two compressor units I have come across were sealed and full of freon. Check the coils to see if you can find a cut line somewhere. If you cannot, DO NOT puncture a coil. The pressure is very high. There are some very small copper lines that are used for pressure sensors and temp sensors. There are also Shraeder valves you can hook up guaces to the unit to test for pressure.
    Last edited by t00nces2; 06-02-2020 at 12:15 PM.

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  26. #17
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    Nice score. looks like $50 to me. Did you get the copper tubing from the condenser to the evaporator coil too?

    If you press the brass fill valves or what ever they are called and no gas comes out it can still be charged. I had that happen last week, was full but it was a side job the guy did, not his 9-5 so i guess he slacked.

    And definitely sell the compressor whole, some are alum windings. Total buzz kill along with the all Alum coils some have.

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  28. #18
    kss started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by t00nces2 View Post
    The two compressor units I have come across were sealed and full of freon. Check the coils to see if you can find a cut line somewhere. If you cannot, DO NOT puncture a coil. The pressure is very high. There are some very small copper lines that are used for pressure sensors and temp sensors. There are also Shraeder valves you can hook up guaces to the unit to test for pressure.

    Well that is not what I wanted to hear lol. Are you saying even though the lines at the back pictured below are cut as seen here:




    its still possibly for it to be full of freon?

  29. #19
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    Ah I guess I see how it could still have freon in it. The 2 pipes that are cut, both have valves before the cut. So if those 2 valves are closed, it could still be full of freon. ****. Is there any way for me to tell without cutting a line?

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    not sure if this gives any more clues to if it has freon or not but these 2 valves had screwed on things over them that were loose. I could spin them off with my hands. Still not sure if there is anyway via these valves to check if there is any freon or not in it. I should have just asked the guy I got it from!



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