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Pokemonprime's Scrapping Finds

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    Post Pokemonprime's Scrapping Finds

    Decided to start a thread in the vein of those by taterjuice ("Tater Strikes Again - The Taterjuice Thread") and others, since threads like those are my favorite to read, I figured I'd make one as well. First finds are fresh off the presses, curb shopped around 9:20 PM today, loaded with hopes and prayers by the beams of a pair of headlights.

    First, three bikes, 2 "complete" (They look to be all there, but I need a better look at them by daylight) and 1 partial, seemingly frame only.




    I also picked up an old pool pump. Dunno what value there in this, if any. Anyone able to throw out a suggestion?

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    Pool Pump is most likely aluminum breakage because the windings are usually aluminum. Some yards buy them as motors.
    Made in China, Recycled in the Republic of Texas!

    "When the mind fails, brute force prevails" - CTSSolutions

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    Pokemonprime started this thread.
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    Been picking up cans as I've normally been for a couple days. Today, I came across two plastic bags, each with about 4 Bud Light cans stuffed in them, thrown off the side of the road. Never thought I'd find bags of cans while walking down the road with a bag of cans.

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    My late father in law would fix up the bikes he found and sell them for way more than scrap at our yard sales. He had about 15 to 20 bikes at each sale! LOL Also wheelbarrows. Pool pump motors can go in with electric motors here. Also if the motor works you could sell it for more than scrap value which is $.15 a pound here. Keep the thread going, I like to see what people find as well!

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    Quote Originally Posted by hobo finds View Post
    My late father in law would fix up the bikes he found and sell them for way more than scrap at our yard sales. He had about 15 to 20 bikes at each sale! LOL Also wheelbarrows. Pool pump motors can go in with electric motors here. Also if the motor works you could sell it for more than scrap value which is $.15 a pound here. Keep the thread going, I like to see what people find as well!
    I love working on bikes and you would be surprised how many are scrapped on farms. This was the start of a learning curve on mechanics that started back in elementary school. I fix them and then donate them to the local schools for the secretaries and janitors to distribute. These are the most knowledgeable employees in a school district.

    No need to know who the most needy families are, but I do enjoy seeing the kids riding one of my bicycles. We have a deal, I will not ask who you gave it to as long as you do not tell who donated them. The reason to remain anonymous is based on not having to concentrate on bikes or who needs money and not wanting to deal with numerous requests. I do the same thing with my Christmas Jars (I started a thread on this a couple of years ago) where I use the local Boy Scout leader. To put it in perspective, the two closest communities to me are at least 15 miles away and less than 3,000 people and kids are free to travel across town in a couple of minutes, if they have a bike. Just a thought for those wanting to give back to there community.

    I had to come back and edit this post because I forgot to mention that a great source for bicycles is your local police department. The bicycles they confiscate are auctioned off periodically. As a teacher they would donate them for my bike riding unit and the kids that did not have a bike would get one free. As a principal one of the teachers had his special needs students work on confiscated bikes as a reward for hard work. Please do not scrap them, there are many families out there that would love to have a bike and many others that will fix them. You just need to look around and be creative.
    Last edited by Patriot76; 05-23-2017 at 05:08 PM.
    Give back more to this world than we take.

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    2 of the three bikes looked pretty roasted, actually, well-loved is the best term. There's obvious evidence that they had a long life, and many patchjob repairs along that line. One of them looks salvageable, but it might be kept for my little brother. The pool pump looks pretty roasted as well, but I'll certainly look into it Do you have any idea how I could test it? Also picked up an old Gateway CRT monitor, which I've been taking apart. A bunch of the wire in the monitor looks to be aluminum, unfortunately. Also, what is the "misc aluminum" category? Like, I have some random bits of shielding, heatsinks, old aluminum food trays, bits of aluminum foil, and that aluminum wire, and I'd like to just throw them in a big group.

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    I can only speak for around this part of the country because different yards sell to different foundries. The heat sinks would sell as cast aluminum, the food trays would sell as aluminum sheet, maybe cast if they are thick enough. If the shielding is aluminum, it would sell as sheet as well as the foil. The wire is a whole separate category. If you throw them together around here you would get sheet for it. Suggestion, Get some 5 gallon pails (painting contractors would be a great place to start) and separate until you have a full bucket before you haul it in.

    Around here 5 gallon pails are easy to come by (oil, hydraulic fluid, transmission fluid, etc.), we have 25 gallon mineral buckets, and chemical totes. It is easy to stock pile these items.

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    There shouldnt be any alum wire in a crt monitor. Tv's can have alum degrausing wires. Especialy Zeniths tv's

    Are you talking about the silver wire going around the back of the glass?? Thats tinned copper if thats what your looking at

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    Around here heat sinks could go as extruded aluminum, the foil as dirty alum. If you scrap the bikes check the rims to see if they are aluminum. Also remove any easy alum parts brake handles and the clamp that holds the seat on. Even if you sell these items as dirty alum better than shred price!

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    To Patriot76: Me & my dad have been looking for a good source of 5 gallon buckets, I'll see if I can track down any local painting contractors or similar outfits. Thanks for the tip.

    To Greytruck: They were the wires running around the back of the monitor, so I guess they're tinned copper then. What do they go for then? I assume a pretty low grade wire.
    To hobo finds: I'll make sure to pull anything aluminum. One of the scrap candidates even has an aluminum frame

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    Tinned copper will actually go in your #2 copper wire so it's pretty good.

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    Really? I typically think the less "pure" the metal is the lower the price, and that tinned copper under insulation is a lot less pure than just copper under insulation, but what do I know. I've been meaning to call the yard for a couple days now and ask them whether they take a pool pump as aluminum breakage or motors, so I guess I'll ask them about tinned copper wiring as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pokemonprime View Post
    Really? I typically think the less "pure" the metal is the lower the price, and that tinned copper under insulation is a lot less pure than just copper under insulation, [...] ask them about tinned copper wiring as well.
    Real tin is over $8 /lb wholesale last I looked

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pokemonprime View Post

    To Greytruck: They were the wires running around the back of the monitor, so I guess they're tinned copper then. What do they go for then? I assume a pretty low grade wire.
    Here, currently one yard pays $1.80 for #2 copper and $1.93 for tinned copper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pokemonprime View Post
    To Patriot76: Me & my dad have been looking for a good source of 5 gallon buckets, I'll see if I can track down any local painting contractors or similar outfits. Thanks for the tip.

    To Greytruck: They were the wires running around the back of the monitor, so I guess they're tinned copper then. What do they go for then? I assume a pretty low grade wire.
    To hobo finds: I'll make sure to pull anything aluminum. One of the scrap candidates even has an aluminum frame
    Pool service companies. The big chlorine tablets they use come in 5 (or maybe larger) gallon buckets. I used a boatload of them when I started out. THen I came across a stash of about 50 matching 30 gallon sterilite tubs and bought 8 of those AV carts from a school surplus auction.
    Out of clutter, find simplicity. --Albert Einstein

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    The big thick black tape wrapped wire goes in #2 insulated wire and the thin silver colored wire can go in with #2 copper here as well

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    Well, started tearing into the pool pump today. I know you guys said to try and sell it on, but it's a real basket case. Tearing it apart today, I could break through the metal with a screwdriver in places, and the paint just came off in sheets. Anyways, I'm glad I didn't cart it in as aluminum breakage, because it has copper windings! Got one end off of it, and removed the large capacitor from its enclosure on the side, and now I'm stuck trying to figure out how to remove the windings.

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    the capacitor can go in with dirty aluminum around here.

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    Removing copper windings from an electric motor requires proper tools, technique, and patience. On this forum's search function, enter removing copper windings or similar language. There is plenty of information there. You'll have to see what works for you and if it's worth the effort to do so. Your technique and speed will improve with the more you do.

    What I do is use an abrasive cut off wheel an cut the windings flush with the case at one end. You can also use a hammer and old wood chisel or a recipro saw to do the same. I prefer the cutoff wheel because it leaves a nice clean cut. Set the case in a vice or on top of a couple blocks of sorts. Than using a blunt punch or bolt and hammer, begin to progressively tap out the windings, going in a circular motion. The object here is to push out as a unit, rather than individually, until they are free, or able to be removed from the other end. Use pliers, grips, or pry bars/screwdrivers to free. TIP: Use a razor knife or similar and cut thru a good portion of the string on the windings before you begin. By the time you are done most of the string pieces will be laying on the floor. Less work. SAFETY INFO: dust mask, ear plugs, safety glasses, gloves at minimum should be used.

    There are other ways, but this method works best for me. Small motors (house fans)are easier than larger motors, but bear less copper. Hope this helps.

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    Removing copper windings from an electric motor requires proper tools, technique, and patience. On this forum's search function, enter removing copper windings or similar language. There is plenty of information there. You'll have to see what works for you and if it's worth the effort to do so. Your technique and speed will improve with the more you do.
    L
    What I do is use an abrasive cut off wheel and cut the windings flush with the case at one end. You can also use a hammer and old wood chisel or a recipro saw to do the same. I prefer the cutoff wheel because it leaves a nice clean cut. Set the case in a vice or on top of a couple blocks of sorts. Than using a blunt punch or bolt and hammer, begin to progressively tap out the windings, going in a circular motion. The object here is to push out as a unit, rather than individually, until they are free, or able to be removed from the other end. Use pliers, grips, or pry bars/screwdrivers to free. TIP: Use a razor knife or similar and cut thru a good portion of the string on the windings before you begin. By the time you are done most of the string pieces will be laying on the floor. Less work. SAFETY INFO: dust mask, ear plugs, safety glasses, gloves at minimum should be used.

    There are other ways, but this method works best for me. Small motors (house fans)are easier than larger motors, but bear less copper. Hope this helps.


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