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  1. #21
    DakotaRog's Avatar
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    A lot of detailed advice here. I guess it boils down to how much time and effort do you want to dink around with stuff?? That in the end will probably help you make your decision. To make the most money, its going to take some thought and focused effort. But to accomplish this, it will take some time. I'm sure there is a point of diminishing returns vs. time but I don't know where that is for this project or for your tolerance. Personally, I agree with some of the others, don't flatten the metal "barn", it looks very usable, especially during your demo phase. Good luck!!



  2. #22
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    Lots of good stuff to save. Save the cupolas!

  3. #23
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    You have received some great advice from members especially if you read between the lines. The barn can be left in place or sold with the buyer tearing it down. The wood and antiques are worth the effort to haul to an urban area and sold at flea markets, Craigs List, antique stores, etc. You have a gold mine and when you remove what you want the fire department idea is fantastic. This type of deal would provide you all the equipment and tools to last you a lifetime. In my opinion the time and effort on this project would be worth the profit. Congratulations.
    The first 50 years are for learning, the next 50 are for living.

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  5. #24
    auction started this thread.
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    I appreciate the great responses.

    ) The toilets were the last thing I'd expect to have any value, but I'll look into that. There's an old outhouse in one of the pics, but it is ROUGH.

    ) The problem with the house and most of the buildings is their location. I plan to build new and they are in the way. I don't know that they would jive well with what's ahead anyway. There's one shop with a concrete floor I would like to save (not pictured).

    ) I'm not firm on anything yet. I need some input from an architect/engineer to know what is possible. Some of the structures could not be rebuilt if they were torn down (boat house and cottage for sure).

  6. #25
    auction started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by alloy2 View Post
    How many acres does your lot consist of, if you turned the land into a cemetery from one acre you'll get 1,250 burial plots Local zoning may not permit the internment of human remains but then a pet cemetery would probably work.

    A pet cemetery plots not as valuable of those for humans but the density would make up the difference.

    These are the sizes offered pet plots in two sizes 2' x 3' and 2' x 4' in flat stone and upright sections.

    Costs for plots vary as widely as the values of homes, depending on demand. In the San Francisco area Ive seen individual grave sites sell for $10,000 to $12,000, Anspach said. In the Midwest that same 38-foot grave site could be $300 to $500. Cemetery owners looking to maximize land space could also opt to build a multi-story mausoleum, which would provide additional interment options.
    I guess I'm looking at 5,000+ plots on the uplands... That's actually something I want to avoid finding once the digging starts!

    What I had in mind was 1) demo 2) subdivide 3) build 4) decide if I really want neighbors that close

  7. #26
    auction started this thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faceball View Post
    This is an awesome property. The house looks pretty rough tho.
    Pic 1 has that tower roof piece; i would try to save that as it would have good resale value.
    The brick chimney looks to have good fired bricks. Save as many as you can if possible. Good resale value in older bricks especially if they have a stamped manufacture. Do some research.
    The open bay shed has potential for outside storage or car port and looks still sound. I wouldn't demo that. If you do, save all the metal roofing, it has value in reuse or resale.
    The outhouse, burn it.
    The first picture on your third post with the windows look to be stained glass or some kind of colored glass. Those could be a small fortune. Save them and as much of the frame and sash as you can.
    The toilets, i don't know. The older ones may have value.
    The big blue barn i wouldn't demo. It looks good and could be used to store building material and equipment for and demo or renovation projects you are doing. A building like that, even in rough shape, would cost tens of thousands to replace but may only need a few thousand to repair. Start with the roof and work your way down.
    WOW, don't toss that farm sink. You will be surprised on how much that is worth.
    The horse tack may be re-purposed but the money is in the cabinet its in. Iv been going to furniture auctions and see these go for stupid money. Old farm cabinets and cupboards are crazy money. Save it as much as possible.
    The last picture is just a small out building and i see no need to demo it. Easily can move it to fit your needs.
    Scattered through some of the pictures i see old tin pales, glass jugs, old door hinges, and lots of just old farm "junk". This stuff has good value and should be collected up. All this type of stuff would be good flee market items or auction stuff.
    I also see a ton of rough cut lumber in almost all of these buildings. Its been said before, this wood has a ton of value. Don't have someone just come in there with a dozer and smash it all up. Take some time and pull beams, planks, windows, old doors and hardware. There are businesses that do this everyday that pay very well.

    Looks to be a huge project, I wish you luck and keep us up to date on what you do please.
    Great info. I'll mull over all these ideas. I took a small load of outdoor "junk" from a house 10 years ago and it brought several hundred dollars. Stuff I thought was pretty much junk. The downside is sometimes it really is junk and a waste of your time and the auctioneers. The other downside as a seller is stuff with real value going for virtually nothing.

    The previous owner wants the lighthouse on the cottage in the first pic (If the building is destroyed)!

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  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by auction View Post
    I guess I'm looking at 5,000+ plots on the uplands... That's actually something I want to avoid finding once the digging starts!

    What I had in mind was 1) demo 2) subdivide 3) build 4) decide if I really want neighbors that close
    How many acres are there in your land purchase, and how large are the lots going to be assuming your going to target a high density housing project to maximize your profits.

    What is the zoning on the property.

    Are you required to set aside any of the land as a recreational reserve ( public park ) or in lieu pay into the reserve fund.

    This must be a very exciting project, have you undertaken similar projects in the past.

  10. #28
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    Wow I see huge profits. I would love to have this project. I am a serious repurposer already. The corregated metal alone is worth a fortune. Old commodes and sinks sell like crazy. I can see all kinds of uses for old doors and the old chimney bricks. And weathered wood. What a gold mine. Have fun with this. I would.
    Quote Originally Posted by auction View Post









  11. #29
    auction started this thread.
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    Is this definitely worth more than scrap?


  12. #30
    auction started this thread.
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    Pool area photos:



  13. #31
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    My opinion is that much of the wood could be marketed and sold. There are those who want old wood but its not a quick easy simple thing to do.

    Running these building over with a bulldozer and cleaning up the mess would be a lot of work. Rather than that you can dismantle and sell off what has value, more money but lots more work.

    There are no simple answers, just hard work. Without a doubt there is value in many of the items and used wood but you are the one who must determine if its worth the effort for you. You will have to educate yourself. i suggest you see if there is a local market for the wood. The other antique type items will have many markets. 73, Mike
    "Profit begins when you buy NOT when you sell." {quote passed down to me from a wise man}

    Now go beat the copper out of something, Miked

  14. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by auction View Post
    This is my new project. I'll be clearing the lot. I'm thinking some will be good for scrapping, some of the stuff people would take for free, some of the stuff may actually have value and the bulk I'll need to pay to get rid of.

    Any input and advice is appreciate. Tell me what's what.










    In you subdivision how much green space are you required.
    The art of survival is a story that never ends. American Hustle.

  15. #33
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    [QUOTE=auction;275565]This is my new project. I'll be clearing the lot. I'm thinking some will be good for scrapping, some of the stuff people would take for free, some of the stuff may actually have value and the bulk I'll need to pay to get rid of.

    Any input and advice is appreciate. Tell me what's what.












  16. #34
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    With a project this large developing a subdivision with services you'll soon find out that time delayed is going to cost you large especially if your working with borrowed funds

    Razz the buildings and get on with your project.

    My thoughts are that your pulling my leg on this subdivision project and I base my opinion on that this lot you purchased this farm is rural and that the building lots that you propose will not legally allow for individual septic systems on each lot so you would have to install a sewage processing plant.

    Also the code for a domestic water well says that the well must be so many feet distant from a septic system which is a prerequisite your not going to be able to meet on a city sized building lot on your proposed subdivision.

    You evade my questions, I think your full of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by auction View Post
    This is my new project. I'll be clearing the lot. I'm thinking some will be good for scrapping, some of the stuff people would take for free, some of the stuff may actually have value and the bulk I'll need to pay to get rid of.

    Any input and advice is appreciate. Tell me what's what.










  17. #35
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    I've seen people and businesses do 1-2 walls in rooms with corrugated "tin" sheets as themes/conversation pieces. I'd pop off that whole wall and put in on CL and/or some other local free ad thing and see what happens. You might be pleasantly surprised...

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  19. #36
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    Here in Mesa Az old corrugated is hot. Last year I salvaged a bunch of it off an old cotton gin said to have been built in the 60's that had been hit by a micro burst near Casa Grande south of the valley. The 3 X 6 really heavy duty weather patina'd sheets were scattered for miles all over the desert. I asked the guy who owned the gin and all the land nearby about the metal. He said take all I want. I had maybe 75 sheets. Some bent and twisted, Put them on Craigslist. A guy saw the ad and dropped by. He wanted a bulk price so he paid me ten bucks a sheet. He took 25 of them. He was building a sports bar and wanted the industrial look. I had no problem selling the rest the next day for even more money. Had I known what I could have gotten I would not have sold the first ones that cheap. I had women buying them for craft projects.

  20. #37
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    Safety front. Do you have asbestos issues in the US with old buildings? It is rife in Australia and a big cost component for many demolitions. Suggest a check through before the guys set to work.

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  22. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by auction View Post
    The problem with the house and most of the buildings is their location. I plan to build new and they are in the way. I don't know that they would jive well with what's ahead anyway. There's one shop with a concrete floor I would like to save.

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  24. #39
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    Personaly I would save some of the buildings. Rest I would use my wrecker...pull the crap over......pick up with the boom and place in piles.. Then bonfire and charge admission......with my 460 4 speed....most of those buildings will fall like card wood. I just demoed a 14x60 mobile home. Buddy on roof.....we took sections of the roof out with a chain saw that could fit in a dumpster, then use the wrecker to load in dumpster. Then we attached the wall to boom and dropped in demo. Think like stacking cord wood. The floor was the pia....ended up dropping trailer on ground.....dropping wheel lift on frame to hold it..and then used boom to rip off in chunks. When dumpster was full...owner didnt purchase big enough dumpster...we used frame of trailer as burnign area for floor. Then cut floor steal beams in 3 sections and loaded on trailer...trailer is 20ft long flat bed. So three sections...done. Chain saw, 2 guys, and a wrecker..20 degrees out....about 4 hours. I had to change out to a electric 12k harbor freight winch for boom. Batteries for it are not tied into truck to keep charged. So I just strapped a genny and 60 amp battery charger to wrecker to keep batteries juiced. Chain saw Husquarvarna 22 inch bar did most of the cutting. It can be done quick if done right with minimal equipmnt and help....1000 profit between scrap and labor paid by owner.

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  26. #40
    auction started this thread.
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    Appreciate the new responses. I am still trying to figure out a plan before deconstructing or demolishing anything. I'm to busy now to put much time into it. I'll probably go for low hanging fruit first. I did send pictures to someone local who makes furniture out of old barn wood. No response... Guess it didn't peak his interest.


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